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Category Archives: web development


Over the weekend, I finally got around to porting Dave Shea's CSS Sprites2 technique to Prototype and script.aculo.us.

My version of CSS Sprites2 is almost exactly the same as Dave's, but it also includes keyboard support. There's a matching focus, blur, keydown and keyup event handler for each mouse event handler.

Get CSS Sprites2 for Prototype and script.aculo.us.

Jeffrey Barke is senior developer and information architect at theMechanism, a multimedia firm with offices in New York, London and Durban, South Africa.

Review of Google I/O at the New York Web Standards Meetup Group 24 July 2008 Notes and links from last night's Google I/O review at the New York Web Standards Meetup Group. Thanks to everyone who made it!

Note—There's a "curated" selection of Google I/O videos posted on my blog at http://jeffreybarke.net/tag/io2008/.

PowerPoint presentation

Demos/tutorials

Jeffrey Barke is senior developer and information architect at theMechanism, a multimedia firm with offices in New York, London and Durban, South Africa.

The New York Web Standards Meetup Group will meet this Thursday (24 July 2008) at theMechanism at 7:00 pm.

Google I/O was a two day developer gathering in San Francisco, 28–28 May 2008, which covered building the next generation of Web applications with Google and open technologies.

Jeffrey Barke, senior developer and information architect at theMechanism – New York, attended and will talk about what he learned there, specifically focusing on Gears, Google App Engine and the Google Ajax APIs. Prior to the meetup, you can read a bit about his experience here and watch some of the videos he's gathered at JeffreyBarke.net.

24 July 2008 . 7:00 pm
theMechanism
440 9th Avenue 8th Floor
New York, NY 10001 [map]

RSVP now!

Please contact us if you'd like to present at the September or October meetup.

Jeffrey Barke is senior developer and information architect at theMechanism, a multimedia firm with offices in New York, London and Durban, South Africa.

theMechanism follows Yahoo!'s Graded Browser Support and agrees with the GBS approach:

In the first 10 years of professional web development, back in the early '90s, browser support was binary: Do you—or don't you—support a given browser? When the answer was "No," user access to the site was often actively prevented. In the years following IE5's release in 1998, professional web designers and developers have become accustomed to asking at the outset of any new undertaking, "Do I have to support Netscape 4.x browsers for this project?"

By contrast, in modern web development we must support all browsers. Choosing to exclude a segment of users is inappropriate, and, with a "Graded Browser Support" strategy, unnecessary.

The two principal concepts of GBS are a broader and more reasonable definition of "support" and the notion of "grades" of support.

More

via Webmonkey:

Variables in cascading stylesheets are now available in the nightly WebKit build.

CSS without variables:

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//Sets the background of the page and tables to the hex code for the color grey<br />
body {<br />
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;background-color: #eceae1;<br />
}<br />
table {<br />
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;background-color: #eceae1;<br />
}

With CSS variables:

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//Defines "DefaultBGColor" to light gray<br />
@variables {<br />
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;DefaultBGColor: #eceae1;<br />
}<br />
//Sets the background and any table on the page to the default background color<br />
body {<br />
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;background-color: var(DefaultBGColor);<br />
}<br />
table {<br />
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;background-color: var(DefaultBGColor);<br />
}

Jeffrey Barke is senior developer and information architect at theMechanism, a multimedia firm with offices in New York, London and Durban, South Africa.