All Posts in The Mechcast

November 30, 2012 - Comments Off on The MechCast 207: What Podcasting Wants

The MechCast 207: What Podcasting Wants

We finally convene for the Sandy-delayed recording of the podcast to discuss Kevin Kelly's book What Technology Wants. Ben, Dave and I do our best to remember what our notes mean since they were written down two months ago when we read the book. Despite the delay we end up having a lively conversation about technology, the future, and human nature.

 

Published by: antonioortiz in The Mechcast
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November 2, 2012 - Comments Off on The MechCast 206: Ghosts in the Soundboard

The MechCast 206: Ghosts in the Soundboard

Hurricane Sandy might have rained on our parade but we're marching on. Dave and I quickly catch up on the Frankenstorm, Halloween and upcoming Mechcast segments. Read your homework for next episode, What Technology Wants, and look forward to an upcoming episode on Indie Game the Movie.

Please consider donating to the Red Cross (blood especially) or volunteering your time to help others with the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Thank you and please consider subscribing.

Published by: benchirlin in The Mechcast
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October 9, 2012 - Comments Off on The MechCast 205: 3D Podcasting

The MechCast 205: 3D Podcasting

We gather about the mic once more to discuss Makerbot and 3D printing. The future is coming people, you'll just need to find the right CAD file to print it for yourself in fact. We discuss the uses of 3D printing as well as the numerous questions it poses for the current practices of fabrication, production, design, copyright and more! Are you part of the maker, hacker or 3D printing community? If so reach out and let us know what experiences you've had in this brave new sector. Thanks for listening and please subscribe.

Showdown of the ages: Godzilla vs. the Doctor care of the Makerbot Store

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August 28, 2012 - Comments Off on The MechCast 204: The Mechcast: The QI Mechanism

The MechCast 204: The Mechcast: The QI Mechanism

 

 

For the latest edition of The Mechcast we try something different. Instead of the usual discussion around a book or a film I ambush everyone with my attempt to emulate QI, the BBC comedy quiz show where interesting answers are awarded more than a right one, and boring answers are penalised more than a wrong one. Ben ends up playing Alan Davies to my Stephen Fry. For 30 minutes much nerd silliness ensues and negative points are awarded.

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Published by: antonioortiz in The Mechcast
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July 25, 2012 - Comments Off on The MechCast 203: We Podcast in Public

The MechCast 203: We Podcast in Public

we-podcast-in-public.mp3

In this episode of the Mechcast the team assembled once again to discuss the digital world. This time, we talk about "We Live in Public," a documentary on the curious figure Josh Harris of the 90's internet bubble. His strange experiments using early internet video, chat rooms, and the abandonment of personal privacy are chillingly familiar. Was he a visionary, businessman, or a huckster? We break it down and then Burst the Bubble with our curious picks and recommendations. Download here or listen below.

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Published by: benchirlin in The Mechcast
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July 23, 2012 - Comments Off on The MechCast 202: I’m Analog, I’m Digital

The MechCast 202: I’m Analog, I’m Digital

The Mechanism brings a unique perspective to interactions with our clients and team. This frame of reference was recently clarified during a conversation with a colleague from a previous job. The two of us have been in the interface industry, arguably since it began in the early 90’s, giving us a different outlook on the design and interactions with clients which produce enlightened creative solutions.

He said, “Dave, we understand the concept of being Digital, while we each possess very Analog dispositions.”

I know what he meant. He was referring to the fact that we had grown up and lived in a world that was once not Digital. We both understood what communication was before personal communication devices. We had experienced the multiple connection revolutions of the 90's, when mobile networks made it affordable to evolve from a device called a "Pager" to a "cellular phone" to "Palm Pilot" to "smartphone". We understood what it meant to spec and order type before we became typographers and we knew how creative solutions were delivered to clients before the computer became the tool that turned everyone into a graphic designer. Rather than standing by complacently observing a communication and creative revolution take place in our lifetime, - we had both chosen to become "Digital" as our lifestyle and profession, yet brought all of the foresight and understanding of what it meant to be "Analog" along for the ride. It’s a rarity that we avoided becoming Luddites or at least individuals that stopped thirsting for the continual influx of wired knowledge, advancing us to become more Digital creatures, while simultaneously holding on to what it meant to be Analog human beings.

It’s a rarity that we avoided becoming Luddites or at least individuals that stopped thirsting for the continual influx of wired knowledge, advancing us to become more Digital creatures, while simultaneously holding on to what it meant to be Analog human beings.

This is an interesting perspective for many reasons, but I believe that my colleague also inadvertently hit on why perhaps, The Mechanism has managed to grow as a collaborative and successful digital agency for 11 years.

Being “Digital” forces us to understand how all User Experiences best translate across myriad devices. Programmers in the Digital space must know the solution before the client even asks the question. It’s also vital that "Digtalists" are generating The Wave and not simply riding it's crest - which is why people that work at The Mechanism are expected to stay ahead of future programming and technical trends.

Being completely Digital, however can make us all a bit apathetic. Communicating with only a buffer of pixels between two human beings breeds misinterpretation.

The human component vital to conversation tends to curtail any miscommunication or misinterpretation that occasionally occurs within the singularly Digital realm.

As soon as you incorporate the concept of being “Analog” – or what I believe is an organic and human component to how we actually do business – that’s when you have something really special.

Despite our swift evolution to being Digital humans, we still perceive the world in Analog. Everything we see and hear is a continuous transmission of information to our senses. I’m much more comfortable walking up to someone in the office to discuss an interface or design solution than to carry on a conversation through Skype (no matter how many "(mooning)" emoticons I can successfully squeeze into a single chat).

The human component vital to conversation tends to curtail any miscommunication or misinterpretation that occasionally occurs within the singularly Digital realm. And that goes for clients as well – while I happily communicate using email or other means of digital services to solve problems, I am best suited (as humans all are) for natural, face-to-face interaction. Until our facial expressions and body language are translated in the Digital realm via real-time color, patterns or background sound recognized by your digital communication device, we won't begin to scratch the surface of everything that Analog communication can accomplish.

In his statement I alluded to above, my friend Jon touched upon the core of what truly can separate a great technical or visual agency from a simply great agency, period. I’d much rather work with clients that I could sit down and have a drink with after work, than simply shift pixels back and forth with. While I rarely get the chance to spend this kind of quality time with clients, it remains the core of what makes us all beautifully vulnerable and what keeps me striving to hold on to Analog traits in an increasingly Digital reality.

Notably this minor revelation occurred between two humans, born Analog, reared Digitally, both communicating without filters over a couple beers at a pub.

More importantly, no "0's" or "1's" were harmed during our conversation.

Published by: davefletcher in The Mechcast
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June 13, 2012 - Comments Off on The MechCast 201: Podcasting Is A Job: The Return Of The Mechcast

The MechCast 201: Podcasting Is A Job: The Return Of The Mechcast

In this edition of the Mechcast, featuring Dave, Antonio, Ben, Chaz and surprise guest Michael, we discuss Mike Monteiro's Design Is A Job, the book we read as part of The Reading Mechanism, our new book club introduced not too long ago here. A lively conversation that touches on money, clients, expectations and real world vs book world situations. We conclude the podcast with a section we call Burst The Bubble, where we share things that we enjoy for you to discover.

Download the podcast (18M, 38 Minutes)

 

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Published by: antonioortiz in The Mechcast
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February 3, 2012 - Comments Off on PressPausePlay – The Complete Documentary

PressPausePlay – The Complete Documentary

The digital revolution of the last decade has unleashed creativity and talent in an unprecedented way, with unlimited opportunities. But does democratized culture mean better art or is true talent instead drowned out? This is the question addressed by PressPausePlay, a documentary film containing interviews with some of the world's most influential creators of the digital era.

We have watched the documentary and it keeps coming up in conversation. You can now watch the whole film below, or visit their website to dowload an interactive version that further explores the themes of the movie.

The Thinking Mechanism is a series of weekly posts, usually published on Fridays, covering the ideas The Mechanism is thinking and talking about with our peers and clients.  

 

Published by: antonioortiz in The Mechcast, The Thinking Mechanism

January 28, 2008 - Comments Off on theMechanism presents: barKode

theMechanism presents: barKode

theMechanism is excited to launch our newest podcast series: barKode.

While our other podcast, theMechcast focuses on group discussions, barKode (partially named after the last name of our Senior Developer in New York, Jeffrey Barke [note the wry use of his last name barKe in the title]) will be focused on educational web design and standards-based talks, including those delivered at the The New York Web Standards Meetup Group. The first episode of barKode is called, “Web Mapping Part One–Google Maps Tutorial” where Jeffrey Barke, Senior Developer at theMechanism, leads a two-part discussion on web mapping in general and Google Maps in particular. Part Two will be on February 21st at 6:30 at the New York Creative Bunker.

You can subscribe and enjoy future episodes of barKode at feedburner.

Published by: davefletcher in The Mechcast